Indian Traditional Styles An Inspiration To Western Designers

Indian traditional styles, fabric, colours become source of inspiration to top western designers

Indian styles, fabric and prints are a source of inspiration to top

India seems to affect people in the strangest of ways. British designer John Galliano was spotted at a society gala in New York wearing a silk saree with a short tuxedo jacket and dress shoes.

Hot new designer John Bartlett introduced flowing orange robes in his men’s collection last fall, saying: “Personally speaking, there’s nothing sexier than a monk or Hare Krishna. They’re so inaccessible.”

And just a few weeks ago, the saree turned up in a most unlikely setting: on model Naomi Campbell at the trendy MTV Music Awards in Radio City Music Hall, New York.

Bits and pieces of Indian style are increasingly being embroidered into the western fashion world. In a bizarre East-West embrace, churidars and mehndi, nose-rings and anklets are teaming up with lingerie and leather motorcycle jackets in collections by designers such as Jean-Paul Gaultier, Oscar de la Renta and Mary McFadden.

“India is a country which has been a source of great inspiration to me, especially Rajasthan,” says De la Renta. “There is an extraordinary sense of colour in the clothing.” He is just one of the many western designers who have been influenced by Indian colours, fabrics and designs.

Yves St Laurent, Karl Lagerfeld, Giorgio Armani, Geoffrey Beene, Bill Blass, Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein, Norma Kamali, Romeo Gigli and McFadden have all made sequinned and jewelled embroidery from India a permanent part of their evening wear collections.

McFadden also gleans inspiration from India’s past – Hindu icons, Mughal architecture and Islamic calligraphy. Cashing in on this fascination, many US-based Indians are making a tidy sum by liaising with Indian craftsmen for fashion pundits abroad.

Increasingly, the influence of India’s colours and cuts can be seen on western styles. The influence is reflected the most in beaded evening wear and brightly coloured resort wear. Indian hot pink, paprika and saffron continue to be popular colours year in and year out.

And even as Nehru jackets and jodhpurs remain staples of the fashion world, designers such as Armani and McFadden have turned to the sleek silhouette of the churidar this year.

Whether it be the churidar or the Kashmiri pheran, the stamp of these top-notch designers is evident on many of the fashions publicised in upmarket stores such as Neiman Marcus, Bloomingdale’s and Saks Fifth Avenue.

Interestingly, when internationally-renowned Belgian designer Dries van Noten brought out his spring collection this April, the horsd’oeuvres were served by waitresses dressed in traditional Indian clothes.

The western passion for Indian fashions can be traced back to the Raj. “Fashion’s flirtation with ethnic looks has traditionally been to give a sense of the exotic. When staid Victorian ladies wrapped a paisley shawl around a crinoline and bustle, they were letting the heat and colour of India into their rigidly-caged clothing,” writes fashion writer Suzy Menkes, in the New York Times.

From the shawls and stoles of the Raj, and tie-and-dye skirts of the Hippie Flower Power days, to the sarong skirts of 1990, India has intrigued the western world.

But despite the growing interest in Indian styles, few international designers do a totally Indian look or an entire collection based on India. “People don’t dress in traditional clothes in western countries. India is a source of inspiration obviously, but you can’t make Indian-looking clothes for every season,” says De la Renta.

Eva Nambeth, Professor of fashion design at the New York-based Fashion Institute of Technology, observes: “The reason Indian fashions haven’t taken over the West is because they are too ethnic and out of place in the western work-place. The trick is to have the Indian influence but with a western touch.”

Menkes’ comment about using ethnic fashion selectively is just as pertinent: “It has to be part of a modern landscape given just a touch of the exotic.” Indeed, western designers have already realised the power of just a dash of colour or a dramatic accessory instead of the wholesale Indian look. This sentiment finds an echo in the paisley prints of De la Renta or the Indian colours of Gigli.

Galliano, Gaultier and Christian Lacroix are masters at avant-garde fashion. On the pages of Vogue, Gaultier displays what the magazine’s editors call ‘global village chic’: a model with an Indian nose-ring and mehndi-like tattoos on her body, wearing African jewellery and a thoroughly American graffiti-scrawled bustier and leggings.Undoubtedly, this year Asian influences have dominated the international fashion scene, perhaps owing to the rash of Hollywood films set in Asia. But the question is whether these designs are just the flavour of the month or a definite trend in western fashion.

Says Richard Martin, curator of the Costume Institute: “I think the whole idea of looking at fashion globally is one that will definitely hold.” Will India hold centre-stage in the future? “I would think so.” says Martin, “because of its clothing, which is highly adaptable.”

But as the high priests of western fashion sell India internationally, what are Indian designers doing? Already, two names are gaining prominence. Sanchita Ajjampur who works from Milan, and New York-based Alpana Bawa have carved a niche for themselves in the American fashion world.

Nambeth – who has also taught at New Delhi’s National Institute of Fashion Technology – believes that India-based designers too can make it big on the international scene if they work on collections which are made in India from Indian fabrics but are not ethnic overall.

Technology, too, needs to be updated. “The textile market has changed, so technology has to change. Designs have to be created for the western market,” says Nambeth.

As the names who matter in the world of fashion go the India way, others follow. “It really comes from the top. So if Ferre or Versace does something, then others follow,” says Nambeth. From haute couture, the look filters down to small boutiques and department stores.

This is where the mass orders come for the Indian garment industry, as they did for the ghagra skirts, which started out as a high fashion statement.

India has one more reason to be happy. The more the country is featured on international catwalks, the greater the demand for its fabrics and embroidery. And for Indian garment manufacturers and craftsmen, a bigger slice of the multi-billion dollar international fashion industry.

Top 15 Elegant Women’s Ethnic Wear Fashion Trend

Top 15 Elegant Women’s Ethnic Wear Fashion Trends

 

1Indo Western Trend

Fashion Fusion is the new trend which is taking the fashion industry to a new level. Indo western wear is a perfect amalgamation of Indian and Western Wear to make you look chic and stylish. Tried out with various style combination and colors , this style will surely  make  you look ravishing and adorable.

2Long Jackets with Palazzos

Pairing up the palazzos with the long jacket is yet another trendy look you can give a try this year. The best way to achieve this subtle look is to either have long jacket unbuttoned from the belly button or have a see-through floor length jacket over your normal crop top paired up with your palazzos to achieve a mesmerizing look.

3Long Jacket with Lehengas

The long jacket with lehengas is yet another popular choice to go for this year. Long slit lehenga jacket either at the front or on the side will definitely shoot up your persona this wedding season.

4Capes

Cape is the biggest successful trend which took the fashion industry altogether to a new level. Cape blends with any ethnic outfit you can think of. Team it up  with any of your lehenga, saree , gowns, anarkali; it will surely make you feel and look like a stunning diva.

5Shirt style/high Neck Blouses

The high neck blouse designs in a new rage among the females to compliment their unique saree style quotient. High neck blouse patterns combined with either embroidery work, stone work or kundan work looks ravishing and classy. Another new trend which is experimented upon is the shirt style saree blouse .It’s a perfect fusion where indo meets western and looks perfect for both the casual and festive affairs.

 

6Slits

This season flaunt your versatile personality with slits. Slits combined with either on front or side of your dress will definitely make you look elegant. Try out your slit kurti with dhoti pants or with palazzos or even with lehenga to impart an ethnic grace to your overall look.

7Silk Sarees

Silk sarees are a number one choice which was and is still ruling the fashion world. Its vibrant color, beautiful patterns and designs are captivating and never fail to capture the fascination of any women who wants to buy a silk saree. Silk sarees are made in every major regions of India. All have their unique fashion sense but once worn they all look beautiful and irresistible.

8Floral Lehengas

Floral lehengas have sparked a fresh and refreshing look which is a delight to your eyes. This season ditch your heavy lehengas and go for this light and carefree look. Match up your floral lehenga with crop top or high neck sleeveless blouse or with a cape or long jacket – any of these styles will surely make you look alluring and eye-popping.

9Phulkari Dress Design

Adopted from the popular ancient Indian work, this new “Flower Work” on the fabrics have glorified the fashion world. Simple plain dresses paired up with any of phulkari shawls, trousers , dupatta or jacket add the vibrant color and looks exquisite.

10Sari Gown

Another successful fusion of traditional and modern look is the saree gown. Available for all body shapes and size and can be prepared with different fabrics; this style surely makes you look immensely beautiful and trendy. This fabulous piece of work looks ravishing paired with silhouettes.

11Ruffled Gowns

Inspired from the western wedding attire, ruffled gown is the customized Indo western look which is getting popular among the brides. Available in soft pastel colors with beautiful gold thread work looks stylish and classy. The ruffles added to your gown will make you look no less than a princess.

12Stylish Kurtis

Kurti is the most favorite choice of women for both the casual and traditional occasions. The most B-town divas like to experiment with their regular style kurtis to add an extra flavor of panache and femininity to their overall presence.

13Crop Top and Skirts

Another trend set by our superstar celebrities is the crop top with skirts.Crop tops have now replaced the traditional choli or traditional blouse designs and looks fab with the lehenga skirts. Try different styles of crop top with your lehengas suiting your body shape to look beautiful and comfortable at the same time in every wedding function or other festive occasions.

14Flowy Lehengas

Elegance and stylish are the two words that perfectly describe the flowy lehengas. The flowy lehengas have extra volume added with numerous pleats to give a fuller flare at the bottom and make you look breathtakingly amazing.

15Stylish Dupattas

No ethnic look be it a lehenga , salwar suit or kurtis is complete without a dupatta. Dupatta be it simple or heavily embroidered adds the magical spark on your ethnic wear. Wide variety of fabrics ranging from net to silk to cotton  and ample designs are available to craft this beautiful piece of cloth to complete your ethnic look.

Perfect Tips On How To Wear Crop Tops

Perfect Tips On How To Wear Crop Tops

I think today every girl incorporates at least one crop top or maybe more than one in her closet. But if you haven`t such a chic essential in your wardrobe you must buy it immediately! Click hereto find a lot of trendy crop top ideas like cool bow sleeve or striped, pretty embroidered or low square neck, classic black or white crop top outfits and order the best one for yourself.

In any case, don’t be shy and wear crop tops without any doubts! Be sure they suit all body types and you’re no exception!

Crop tops are so versatile that you just need to find a way in which you can be comfortable in wearing them as there are million different ways you can style crop tops. But here you must remember the most important thing: when you want to dress a crop top it shouldn`t look like as you’re going to the beach! It should look cool and gorgeous!

So now my aim is to show you some of the most popular ways on how to style crop tops to make your look perfect.

Crop Top With High Waisted Jeans

Crop tops became increasingly popular during the 90s. The Spice Girls, Cristine Aguilera and Britney Spears are considered as the trendsetters of “belly shirts”. Today the same fashion trend continues!

A halter, short or full sleeve crop tops with your high waisted jeans always make your look more attractive and sexier. All you need is just to add a pair of heels or boots as they fit this casual street style very well.

Skirt And Crop Top Outfits

Wearing a midi or maxi skirt may seem a little bit conservative. But if you match it with a crop top it will look completely different and more flirtatious. Just pay attention what you`d like to stress – if you’re wider up top and a bit narrower at the hips put on a halter crop top, if you want to accent your long legs it would be better to dress full sleeve crop top with a high waist midi or maxi skirt.

Source: https://www.topteny.com/perfect-tips-wear-crop-tops/

Indian Traditional Styles An Inspiration To Western Designers22

Indian traditional styles, fabric, colours become source of inspiration to top western designers

Indian styles, fabric and prints are a source of inspiration to top

India seems to affect people in the strangest of ways. British designer John Galliano was spotted at a society gala in New York wearing a silk saree with a short tuxedo jacket and dress shoes.

Hot new designer John Bartlett introduced flowing orange robes in his men’s collection last fall, saying: “Personally speaking, there’s nothing sexier than a monk or Hare Krishna. They’re so inaccessible.”

And just a few weeks ago, the saree turned up in a most unlikely setting: on model Naomi Campbell at the trendy MTV Music Awards in Radio City Music Hall, New York.

Bits and pieces of Indian style are increasingly being embroidered into the western fashion world. In a bizarre East-West embrace, churidars and mehndi, nose-rings and anklets are teaming up with lingerie and leather motorcycle jackets in collections by designers such as Jean-Paul Gaultier, Oscar de la Renta and Mary McFadden.

“India is a country which has been a source of great inspiration to me, especially Rajasthan,” says De la Renta. “There is an extraordinary sense of colour in the clothing.” He is just one of the many western designers who have been influenced by Indian colours, fabrics and designs.

Yves St Laurent, Karl Lagerfeld, Giorgio Armani, Geoffrey Beene, Bill Blass, Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein, Norma Kamali, Romeo Gigli and McFadden have all made sequinned and jewelled embroidery from India a permanent part of their evening wear collections.

McFadden also gleans inspiration from India’s past – Hindu icons, Mughal architecture and Islamic calligraphy. Cashing in on this fascination, many US-based Indians are making a tidy sum by liaising with Indian craftsmen for fashion pundits abroad.

Increasingly, the influence of India’s colours and cuts can be seen on western styles. The influence is reflected the most in beaded evening wear and brightly coloured resort wear. Indian hot pink, paprika and saffron continue to be popular colours year in and year out.

And even as Nehru jackets and jodhpurs remain staples of the fashion world, designers such as Armani and McFadden have turned to the sleek silhouette of the churidar this year.

Whether it be the churidar or the Kashmiri pheran, the stamp of these top-notch designers is evident on many of the fashions publicised in upmarket stores such as Neiman Marcus, Bloomingdale’s and Saks Fifth Avenue.

Interestingly, when internationally-renowned Belgian designer Dries van Noten brought out his spring collection this April, the horsd’oeuvres were served by waitresses dressed in traditional Indian clothes.

The western passion for Indian fashions can be traced back to the Raj. “Fashion’s flirtation with ethnic looks has traditionally been to give a sense of the exotic. When staid Victorian ladies wrapped a paisley shawl around a crinoline and bustle, they were letting the heat and colour of India into their rigidly-caged clothing,” writes fashion writer Suzy Menkes, in the New York Times.

From the shawls and stoles of the Raj, and tie-and-dye skirts of the Hippie Flower Power days, to the sarong skirts of 1990, India has intrigued the western world.

But despite the growing interest in Indian styles, few international designers do a totally Indian look or an entire collection based on India. “People don’t dress in traditional clothes in western countries. India is a source of inspiration obviously, but you can’t make Indian-looking clothes for every season,” says De la Renta.

Eva Nambeth, Professor of fashion design at the New York-based Fashion Institute of Technology, observes: “The reason Indian fashions haven’t taken over the West is because they are too ethnic and out of place in the western work-place. The trick is to have the Indian influence but with a western touch.”

Menkes’ comment about using ethnic fashion selectively is just as pertinent: “It has to be part of a modern landscape given just a touch of the exotic.” Indeed, western designers have already realised the power of just a dash of colour or a dramatic accessory instead of the wholesale Indian look. This sentiment finds an echo in the paisley prints of De la Renta or the Indian colours of Gigli.

Galliano, Gaultier and Christian Lacroix are masters at avant-garde fashion. On the pages of Vogue, Gaultier displays what the magazine’s editors call ‘global village chic’: a model with an Indian nose-ring and mehndi-like tattoos on her body, wearing African jewellery and a thoroughly American graffiti-scrawled bustier and leggings.Undoubtedly, this year Asian influences have dominated the international fashion scene, perhaps owing to the rash of Hollywood films set in Asia. But the question is whether these designs are just the flavour of the month or a definite trend in western fashion.

Says Richard Martin, curator of the Costume Institute: “I think the whole idea of looking at fashion globally is one that will definitely hold.” Will India hold centre-stage in the future? “I would think so.” says Martin, “because of its clothing, which is highly adaptable.”

But as the high priests of western fashion sell India internationally, what are Indian designers doing? Already, two names are gaining prominence. Sanchita Ajjampur who works from Milan, and New York-based Alpana Bawa have carved a niche for themselves in the American fashion world.

Nambeth – who has also taught at New Delhi’s National Institute of Fashion Technology – believes that India-based designers too can make it big on the international scene if they work on collections which are made in India from Indian fabrics but are not ethnic overall.

Technology, too, needs to be updated. “The textile market has changed, so technology has to change. Designs have to be created for the western market,” says Nambeth.

As the names who matter in the world of fashion go the India way, others follow. “It really comes from the top. So if Ferre or Versace does something, then others follow,” says Nambeth. From haute couture, the look filters down to small boutiques and department stores.

This is where the mass orders come for the Indian garment industry, as they did for the ghagra skirts, which started out as a high fashion statement.

India has one more reason to be happy. The more the country is featured on international catwalks, the greater the demand for its fabrics and embroidery. And for Indian garment manufacturers and craftsmen, a bigger slice of the multi-billion dollar international fashion industry.

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